Happy Cyber Monday: Giveaway Winners

NOV_promoWINNERS

Thank you SO much to everyone who entered our 10 Days of Giveaways. We loved sharing activities and lessons to expand our books beyond story time.

If you did not win, but want to find the books for your classroom (or for holiday giving!) you can find all of the above (and more!) in our books section, here.

And the winners are…

DADDY DEPOT: Anna Bethea
THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK: Heidi
BEAR AND CHICKEN: Janet
BAT COUNT: Lisa Connors
BOB AND JOSS GET LOST!: Jennifer Hansen
A BOOK OF BRIDGES, HERE TO THERE AND ME TO YOU: Hope Lim
WHOBERT WHOVER: Jenny Ham
GRANDMOTHER THORN: Cara Wegrzyn
SMALL: Lisa Connors
FRESH PICKED POETRY: Wendy Greenley

Congratulations to all the winners!

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In The Classroom with THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK (plus a Giveaway!)

It may not be normal but THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK is a hilarious read-aloud that can also be used in fun lessons about language arts, science, and social-emotional discussions about collaboration and compromise.

THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK begins as a stroll through the common, every day, normal animals – mammal, bird, amphibian, insect, reptile, and fish. The story quickly evolves, however, into a meta-fiction disagreement between the author and illustrator over how to draw the animals. The author wants simple, normal animal drawings. The illustrator, however, is confused and makes a bit of a mess. The conflict reaches its peak when the illustrator refuses to draw the author’s choice of fish. Granted, the blobfish is an unusual choice of fish.

With the below activities, kids will laugh while learning! Here are a few fun ways to use the book in your classrooms:

The Magic of Voice

THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK is a book in two voices – the author and the illustrator. Before reading the book aloud, ask the kids to create the book characters so they can act out the story. They can draw pictures of an author and an illustrator and glue them onto craft sticks, or make puppets out of socks or paper lunch bags, or bring in stuffed animals to represent the two different characters. Anything works! Have fun as the kids join in on the storytelling with their “characters!” For older readers, you can take the dramatic read-aloud to the next level by discussing the personality traits of each character as reflected in their dialog.

What Kind of Animal is That?

Different animal classes have different characteristics. Use the back matter in THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK to brainstorm animals in each category and then play animal charades! The kids can play individually or in teams and act out different animals while others guess the animal and its classification!

Collaboration and Compromise

In THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK, the author and illustrator don’t agree on how the animals should be presented. In the classroom, you can reenact this author-illustrator dynamic by having the kids write a short story with the plan that it will be illustrated. Then, ask them to illustrate someone else’s story! Discuss the challenges and benefits of relinquishing control over the art. Reflect on any conflicts or compromises that were encountered along the way, and how they were resolved. Some qualities that make for good collaboration include: Listen to the other person; when you disagree with someone’s opinion, disagree with the idea, not the person (respect one another); and, allow for compromise if there is a disagreement.

For complete standards-aligned lesson plans for grades PreK-6, visit http://juliesegalwalters.com/index.php/2017/10/31/teachers-guides-are-available/!

 Julie Segal-Walters is the author of THIS IS NOT A NORMAL ANIMAL BOOK. She lives in Washington, D.C. with her husband, son, and pesky cat. Before becoming a writer, Julie was the president and founder of Civic Action Strategies, a grassroots organizing and democracy development consulting firm. She worked in Kosovo, where she directed citizen engagement programs for U.S. and European organizations.

You can find more information about Julie on her website or on Twitter.

GIVEAWAY TIME! Click HERE to enter the Rafflecopter giveaway of a FREE classroom Skype visit (+book swag for the students)!

Making Connections with A BOOK OF BRIDGES: HERE TO THERE AND ME TO YOU

Here To There Cover PublicitiyA BOOK OF BRIDGES: HERE TO THERE AND ME TO YOU explores more than just the bridge as a structure connecting one place to another. It explores how we connect as human beings.  

In A BOOK OF BRIDGES, one layer of text gives simple descriptions of bridges for the youngest listeners while another layer provides facts on the bridges for the older reader. Combining the layers provides a bridge between reading and listening together in a story time setting.

Here are a few other ways to help kids learn more about bridges and making connections.

Connecting to Bridges

Make a bridge from popsicle sticks, paper plates, or marshmallows. Find a picture of a local bridge as a model.  Here are a few examples:

http://www.ehow.com/how_8532586_build-marshmallow-bridge.html

https://www.danyabanya.com/sydney-harbour-bridge-craft/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/564146290793837409/

Connecting to Geography

Use a map or globe to locate the book’s bridges.

Go exploring. Take a drive with your family around your neighborhood and see how many bridges you can spot.  Turn it into a game.  Whoever spots the most bridges wins!

Connecting to Pictures

Look closer at the pictures in the book. What people, places, and things are the bridges in the book connecting? Make up your own story. Where do you think they are going? What do think they are doing? Who do they want to connect to?

Dragonflies flutter about on many of the pages.  How many can you spot?

Author Cheryl Keely and illustrator Celia Krampien love dogs. How many dogs can you spot in the pictures?

Connecting to People

Playing games is fun.  Play the Drawbridge Game with your friends or classmates.  Find the instructions here: https://www.cherylkeely.com/learning-playing

What other types of bridges can you make by working together?

A BOOK OF BRIDGES Giveaway!

cropped 805.2Use this Rafflecopter link to be entered to win a copy of A BOOK OF BRIDGES: HERE TO THERE AND ME TO YOU and up to 50 bookmarks for your classroom.

Cheryl Keely is a children’s book writer who loves to create picture books because they combine her love of learning and love of playing. When not writing, Cheryl volunteers with her dog Dagaz as a pet ambassador team with a local pet therapy organization in her home of Louisville, Ky. One of our favorite visits is to a local elementary school where the children take turns reading to the dogs. Her debut picture book, A BOOK OF BRIDGES: HERE TO THERE AND ME TO YOU, is out now from Sleeping Bear Press

Two Debut Interview – Joy Keller and Alison Goldberg

In today’s Picture the Books Two Debut Interview, debut author Alison Goldberg interviews debut author Joy Keller about MONSTER TRUCKS illustrated by Misa Saburi (Godwin Books/Henry Holt, 2017).

 

Alison: Congratulations on your debut! Before we discuss MONSTER TRUCKS, I see in your bio that you have experience driving trucks on a blueberry farm. What was that like?

 

Joy: I drove a pickup truck that was converted into a surrey. I’d pick up customers and drop them off to pick blueberries. The farm was forty acres. Sometimes the surrey also doubled as a rescue truck, so I’d have to drive really fast over the bumps in the field. It was a fun job, and a chance to learn to drive a stick shift.

Alison: And great research for writing a truck book! If you could visit the world of any picture book, which would it be?

Joy: If I had to pick a character that I would want to hang out with, it would be Otter from the OTTER books by Sam Garton. Otter is so funny and gets into so much trouble. She reminds me of my own kids. If I was just looking at pictures, I would choose the very old-school fairy tale worlds created by Trina Schart Hyman. LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD and SAINT GEORGE AND THE DRAGON books from when I was a kid have amazing illustrations. I’d like to walk through those worlds.

Alison: Where did the idea for MONSTER TRUCKS come from?

Joy: When my kids were little, my daughter only liked Halloween books and my son only liked truck books. We would check the same books out of the library all the time. I wondered why there wasn’t a book combining the two. It could be called MONSTER TRUCKS! Once I had the title, the story followed.

Alison: MONSTER TRUCKS is such a perfect blend of these two themes. Do you have a favorite Halloween costume from childhood?

Joy: My parents did a really good job making elaborate homemade costumes for me. One year, I was the Queen of Hearts. My mom copied every little detail of a playing card onto the front and back of my poster board costume. I didn’t want to take it off at school, but I couldn’t sit in it, so I stood for much of the day.

Alison: What’s your favorite truck?

Joy: When I was a kid I loved the street cleaner with a vacuum tube used to suck up debris. I called it the elephant truck.

Alison: That sounds like the start of another truck book. As a teacher, do you ever share your picture book manuscripts with your students?

Joy: I do. I also share my revisions. Kids often think that when you are a writer you only need to write something once, and I like to show them that even published writers need to rewrite stories many times. I share my rejection letters, too, so they can see that part of the process.

Alison: How will you celebrate the release of MONSTER TRUCKS?

Joy: My release party is taking place in an ice cream shop called Moonlight Creamery. They’re going to rename all of their ice cream flavors to match the book, including a flavor called “Tire Tracks.”

 

Alison: How fun! You have a few other picture books coming out after your debut. Can you tell me about them?

 

Joy: I’m so excited about MISS TURIE’S MAGIC CREATURES (Innovation Press, 2018), a book about a pet store that sells mythical beasts.

I also have a nonfiction book about fungus coming out in 2019 called THE FUNGUS AMONG US (Innovation Press, 2019). My son developed a fascination with mushrooms when he was little, so we go on hikes and get pictures of different varieties. They’re cool to look at and learn about, but I don’t especially like to eat mushrooms!

Alison: I look forward to reading these books. Thanks, Joy! Congratulations!

 

Joy Keller isn’t a monster, but she does have experience driving trucks on a blueberry farm. Her debut picture book, MONSTER TRUCKS (Henry Holt, 2017), is all about monsters and the vehicles that match their personalities, from the skeleton crew that fixes roads to the werewolf who digs, digs, digs. Joy currently teaches elementary students of all ages and lives in Fairport, NY with her husband, two children, and four cats. You can visit her at www.joykellerauthor.com or find her on Twitter @jrkeller80.

 

Alison Goldberg is a writer based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. I LOVE YOU FOR MILES AND MILES, illustrated by Mike Yamada (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, December 2017) is her debut picture book. Before becoming a children’s book author, Alison worked for economic justice organizations and wrote a resource guide about social change philanthropy. These days, she blogs about activism in children’s literature and loves researching everything from marine life to contemporary art for her books. She is represented by Kathleen Rushall of the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Learn more at www.alisongoldberg.com or on Twitter @alisongoldberg.